Help shape our justice future, New Zealand

The Hāpaitia te Oranga Tangata – Safe and Effective Justice initiative has been set up to transform the criminal justice system and create a safer Aotearoa New Zealand.

We want to understand what people think about our criminal justice system and how we might improve it. By taking part you will have an impact on the direction of criminal justice reform in New Zealand.

Your privacy is important to us and the information you provide will only be used for our research purposes.

To help you with your thoughts, you may like to look at the facts and figures below.

The Hāpaitia te Oranga Tangata – Safe and Effective Justice initiative has been set up to transform the criminal justice system and create a safer Aotearoa New Zealand.

We want to understand what people think about our criminal justice system and how we might improve it. By taking part you will have an impact on the direction of criminal justice reform in New Zealand.

Your privacy is important to us and the information you provide will only be used for our research purposes.

To help you with your thoughts, you may like to look at the facts and figures below.

Infographic showing instance of crime reporting in New Zealand.

Instances of reporting (above): According to the New Zealand Crime and Victims Survey 2018, three quarters of crime isn't reported to Police.

Infographic showing New Zealand rates of imprisonment compared to Australia, England/Wales and Canada.

Rates of imprisonment (above): According to the Ministry of Justice (March 2019), New Zealand has a high imprisonment rate at 206 prisoners per 100,000 population when compared to Australia (172), England/Wales (139) and Canada (114). This incidence of imprisonment also includes a high rate of prisoners being reconvicted after release from prison with 61% of all released prisoners reconvicted within two years.

Infographic showing the location of offenders in New Zealand.

Location of offenders (above): According to the Ministry of Justice (2013), most offenders in New Zealand live in deprived areas.

Infographic showing the literacy and numeracy rates of prisoners in New Zealand.

Literacy and numeracy (above): The Department of Corrections (2017) found that 60% of people in prison have literacy and numeracy levels below NCEA Level One competency.

Graphic showing Maori representation in prisons in New Zealand.

Māori representation (above): In 2018, the Department of Corrections and Stats NZ figures showed that while only 16% of the population was Māori, 51% of the prison population was Māori.

Infographic showing increased rates of Maori representation in New Zealand prisons from 1800s.

Increase in Māori representation (above): The graphic above shows the rise in the percentage of the Māori prison population from the 1800s to 2015. According to the Ministry of Justice and Te Ara—The Encyclopedia of New Zealand, Māori representation in the prison population has risen from less than 3% throughout most of the 1800s, to 21% by 1945. By 1971 40% of prison population was Māori and in 2015 more than 55% of the prison population was Māori.

Infographic showing rates of substance use disorders of New Zealand prisoners.

Substance use disorders (above): The Department of Corrections (2016) reported that 87% of New Zealand prisoners have had a substance use disorder at any point in their life, with 47% having a substance use disorder within the last 12 months.

Graph showing the average court processing times for offenders in New Zealand.

Court processing times (above): According to the Ministry of Justice (2019), over 4,000 serious harm cases with a jury trial took more than one year to finalise. Less serious cases (up to two years in prison) took an average of 75 days to finalise; more serious cases without a jury (over two years in prison) took an average of 170 days to finalise; and more serious cases with a jury trial took on average 350 days to finalise.

More information and evidence is available at www.safeandeffectivejustice.govt.nz/research/


Share your views

Take five minutes to help shape the future of criminal justice in New Zealand.

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The graph below shows how every $100 spent on the criminal justice system in New Zealand is allocated (below).

The graph below shows how every  100 spent on the criminal justice system in new zealand is allocated
In your opinion, are we allocating resources in the right way?
The graph above shows the breakdown of every $100 spent on the criminal justice system as follows: $35.71 on managing sentences (e.g. prisons and probation), $12.76 on preventing crime (e.g. police crime prevention activities), $7.65 on rehabilitating offenders (e.g. rehabilitation programmes), $0.51 on supporting victims (e.g. counselling and financial services), $12.76 on investigating crime (e.g. police investigations) and $30.61 adjudicating cases (e.g. courts and police prosecutions).
How you would change the way money is spent across the following categories:
How you would change the way money is spent across the following categories: Spend more Spend less No change
Investigating crime (e.g. police investigations)
Adjudicating cases (e.g. courts and police prosecutions)
Managing sentences (e.g. prisons and probation)
Preventing crime (e.g. police crime prevention activity)
Rehabilitating offenders (e.g. rehabilitation programmes)
Supporting victims (e.g. counselling and financial assistance)
Please hold on while your response is being submitted